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Video Hatch: “Sir David Attenborough Talks Salmon for IYS”

Video Hatch: “Sir David Attenborough Talks Salmon for IYS”

In this video from Salmon & Trout Conservation, Sir David Attenborough shares his views on the need to protect all populations of wild salmon. The video marks the celebration of the International Year of the Salmon.


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Video Hatch: “Shakey’s Bonefish”

Video Hatch: “Shakey’s Bonefish”

In this video from Vince Tobia, view some great aerial footage of fly fishing Crooked Island in The Bahamas.


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Rep Your Water Sun Shirts: Lighter, Re-Designed & More Affordable

Rep Your Water Sun Shirts: Lighter, Re-Designed & More Affordable

Just in time for warm weather fishing conditions, Rep Your Water has release a re-designed line of sun shirts.

Read more in the press release below.

Rep Your Water Sun Shirts: Lighter, Re-Designed & More Affordable

From RepYourWater:

New Sun Shirts and Hoodies

We did a full redesign on our Sun Shirts and Hoodies for this year. We kept to the soft, supple feel but lightened them up and brought in a new color palate. We also reduced the price to you. Grab one.

Special Edition BHA X RepYourWater Sun Hoody

Featuring a reproduction of a pen and ink original by our designer Garrison Doctor, this one is a perfect choice for all of your high country adventures this summer. 20% supports Backcountry Hunters & Anglers.

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American Rivers Announces America’s Most Endangered Rivers of 2019

American Rivers Announces America’s Most Endangered Rivers of 2019

American Rivers has released its annual list of America’s Most Endangered Rivers of 2019. “This year’s report spotlights the threat that climate change poses to rivers, clean water supplies, public safety and communities nationwide.”

Read more in the press release below.

American Rivers Announces America’s Most Endangered Rivers of 2019

From American Rivers:

American Rivers today released its annual list of America’s Most Endangered Rivers®, identifying ten rivers facing imminent threats. This year’s report spotlights the threat that climate change poses to rivers, clean water supplies, public safety and communities nationwide.

From water scarcity on New Mexico’s Gila River, named the #1 Most Endangered River in the country, to sea-level rise on the Hudson and flooding on the Upper Mississippi, America’s Most Endangered Rivers of 2019 illustrates what’s at stake and the choices facing communities.

“Climate change is striking rivers and water supplies first and hardest,” said Bob Irvin, President and CEO of American Rivers. “America’s Most Endangered Rivers is a call to action. We must speak up and take action, because climate change will profoundly impact every river and community in our country. Healthy rivers are our best defense against droughts, floods and the impacts of a changing climate.”

Climate change is the most consequential environmental challenge facing our planet. In the U.S., cities are struggling to do more with less water, fish and wildlife are struggling to survive, forest fires are growing more destructive and storms are triggering more life-threatening floods. In March, record flooding across the Midwest killed at least four people and cost more than $3 billion in property damages in Nebraska and Iowa. The harshest impacts of climate change are often most prevalent in communities of color and economically disadvantaged communities.

The National Climate Assessment released in 2018 states, “Water quality and water supply reliability are jeopardized by climate change in a variety of ways that affect ecosystems and livelihoods…Very heavy precipitation events have increased nationally and are projected to increase in all regions. The length of dry spells is projected to increase in most areas, especially the southern and northwestern portions of the contiguous United States.”

The top three rivers in America’s Most Endangered Rivers of 2019 demonstrate how climate change is already having an impact, and how our actions will either weaken or strengthen river communities:

  • #1 Gila River –The Southwest is becoming hotter and drier due to climate change. Building a costly new diversion and compromising river health doesn’t make sense when there are cheaper, more effective water supply alternatives for the region.
  • #2 Hudson River – Rising sea levels resulting from climate change threaten New York City.  Instead of installing massive storm-surge barriers that would damage this rich estuary ecosystem, we must find better, more reliable and flexible solutions to protect people and property.
  • #3 Upper Mississippi River –Increased flooding is occurring throughout the Upper Mississippi basin due to climate change. Choking the river with new levees and traditional flood control structures threatens public safety by making flooding worse downstream.

“Our nation is at a crossroads. If we continue to degrade and abuse our rivers, we will compromise our ability to deal with increasingly severe droughts and floods. But if we protect and restore our rivers in thoughtful and equitable ways that do not perpetuate the mistakes of the past, we can strengthen our communities and create a more secure future,” Irvin said.

“We are committed to spotlighting threats and working with communities on solutions that benefit people and rivers. We believe everyone in our country deserves clean water and a healthy river.”

In addition to announcing the nation’s ten endangered rivers, American Rivers honored Ohio’s Cuyahoga River as “River of the Year.” The title spotlights the river as a national success story and celebrates the progress Cleveland has made in cleaning up the Cuyahoga, fifty years since the river’s famous fire that sparked the nation’s environmental movement.

“Fifty years ago, the Cuyahoga River was so polluted it caught fire. In this anniversary year, we celebrate the progress that has been made in Cleveland, and we underscore the importance of clean, healthy rivers to cities nationwide,” said Irvin. “May other cities draw inspiration from Cleveland’s story, and may we all work together to spark an urban river renaissance nationwide. Because everyone in our country deserves clean water and a healthy river.”

In its 34th year, the annual America’s Most Endangered Rivers® report is a list of rivers at a crossroads, where key decisions in the coming months will determine the rivers’ fates. Rivers are chosen for the list based on the following criteria: 1) The magnitude of the threat, 2) The significance of the river to people and nature and 3) A critical decision-point in the coming year. Over the years, the report has helped spur many successes including the removal of outdated dams and the prevention of harmful development and pollution.

AMERICA’S MOST ENDANGERED RIVERS® OF 2019

#1 Gila River, New Mexico
Gov. Grisham must choose a healthier, more cost-effective way to provide water to agriculture than by drying up the state’s last major free-flowing river.

#2 Hudson River, New York

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers must consider effective, nature-based alternatives to storm-surge barriers that would choke off this biologically rich tidal estuary.

#3 Upper Mississippi River, Illinois, Iowa, Missouri

State and federal agencies must enforce laws that prohibit illegal levees, which increase flood risk for communities and degrade vital fish and wildlife habitat.

#4 Green-Duwamish River, Washington

Local leaders must produce a flood protection plan that safeguards communities and restores habitat for chinook salmon — fish that are essential to the diet of Puget Sound’s endangered orca whales.

#5 Willamette River, Oregon

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers must immediately improve 13 dams to save wild chinook salmon and steelhead from going extinct.

#6 Chilkat River, Alaska

The Japanese investment firm, DOWA, must do the responsible thing and back out of a mining project that could decimate native salmon.

#7 South Fork Salmon River, Idaho

The U.S. Forest Service must safeguard endangered fish by denying a mining proposal that could pollute this tributary of the Wild and Scenic Salmon River.

#8 Buffalo National River, Arkansas

Gov. Hutchinson must demand closure of an industrial hog-farming facility that pollutes groundwater and threatens endangered species.

#9 Big Darby Creek, Ohio

Local leaders must use state-of-the-art science to craft a responsible development plan that protects this pristine stream.

#10 Stikine River, Alaska

The International Joint Commission of the United States and Canada must protect the river’s clean water, fish and wildlife, and indigenous communities by stopping harmful, polluting mines.

ABOUT AMERICAN RIVERS

American Rivers believes every community in our country should have clean water and a healthy river. Since 1973, we have been protecting wild rivers, restoring damaged rivers and conserving clean water for people and nature. With headquarters in Washington, D.C., and offices across the country, we are the most effective river conservation organization in the United States, delivering solutions that will last for generations to come. Find your connections at AmericanRivers.org.

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Podcast Episode: How to Start Fly Fishing via Saltwater Experience

Podcast Episode: How to Start Fly Fishing via Saltwater Experience

Learn the fundamentals of fly fishing, in fresh or saltwater, in this podcast episode of the Saltwater Experience.


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Video Hatch: “Patagonia Wader Work Station”

Video Hatch: “Patagonia Wader Work Station”

Attaching to wader suspenders, Patagonia’s versatile Wader Work Station helps organize tools, gear and accessories in the field.


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Podcast Episode: Joe Brooks on Wet Fly Swing

Podcast Episode: Joe Brooks on Wet Fly Swing

In this episode of the Wet Fly Swing podcast, host Dave Stewart talks with Joe Brooks, producer of the recent documentary about the legendary angler of the same name, Joe Brooks, who was his grandfather’s brother. “We find out how the late great Joe Brooks fell from grace to live on the streets but pulled himself out of the gutter to become one of the most influential fly fisherman in history.”


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The Harris Collection of Irish and English Fly Patterns

The Harris Collection of Irish and English Fly Patterns

A two-part article in the Winter and Spring 2019 issues of The American Fly Fisher, the journal of the American Museum of Fly Fishing, explores the world’s oldest known artificial flies. The patterns date from the late 1700s and early 1800s and are part of the Harris Collection of Irish and English fly patterns at AMFF.

Read more in the press release below. 

The Harris Collection of Irish and English Fly Patterns

Manchester, Vermont (April 2019) The American Museum of Fly Fishing

Celebrating the World’s Oldest Known Flies

A rare look back more than two centuries to the fly-tying savvy revealed by the extraordinary Harris Collection of Irish and English fly patterns at the American Museum of Fly Fishing.

The American Fly Fisher, the journal of the American Museum of Fly Fishing, has published a thorough analysis of the world’s oldest known artificial flies, dating from the late 1700s and early 1800s. Written by Andrew Herd and Paul Schullery, the two-part article appears in the Winter and Spring 2019 issues of the journal.

Herd, the leading British fly-fishing historian, and Schullery, former director of the museum, describe and analyze the unique collection of historic trout and salmon flies that include the oldest known flies anywhere, dating from the late 1700s. “These are amazing artifacts,” says AMFF Executive Director Sarah Foster. “Merely their survival for more than two centuries is a big deal.” The collection has never before been studied or analyzed in any detail, as it has spent almost all of the past 200 years in private hands. In several significant ways, Herd and Schullery’s analysis of these flies pushes back the earliest known dates of various fly-tying practices, often by decades. American Fly Fisher Editor Kathleen Achor agrees: “Among other things, this collection has also allowed us to connect the first realistic published illustrations of artificial flies from the late-eighteenth and early-nineteenth centuries with historically contemporary artificial flies. These articles are possibly the most important new development in the study of early fly-fishing history since Professor Richard Hoffmann’s scholarly research in the 1980s and 1990s dramatically reshaped our understanding of the origins of Old World fly fishing.”

The articles are generously illustrated with scans of the earliest known woodcuts and engravings of flies that appeared in fishing books in the 1600s and 1700s, as well as with a wealth of spectacular color photographs of painstakingly accurate replicas of the original flies tied by Australian master fly tier Robert Frandsen.

The flies were originally gathered, used, and carefully documented by the Gregory family of Galway, whose colorful and often quirky history is also chronicled in the articles. The flies eventually came into the hands of Irish fly-fishing writer John Richard Harris, a fellow of the Royal Entomological Society and author of the milestone An Angler’s Entomology (1952), which featured among its many illustrations a photograph of a few of these very flies. The flies eventually made their way into the hands of Dorothy Downs (of Branford, CT), who generously donation them to the museum in 1991.

“We at the museum have always prided ourselves on leading the exploration of our sport’s fascinating history,” said Sarah Foster. “Over the years we’ve published many discoveries, but none may be more significant than this groundbreaking study of a truly unique collection of flies. For a direct connection with our eighteenth-century angling ancestors, there is nothing that approaches the Harris Collection.”

The American Museum of Fly Fishing was founded in 1968 by a group of passionate anglers who wanted to ensure that the history of fly fishing was preserved as an important part of America’s culture, industry, and history. Having just celebrated its fiftieth anniversary, staff has energetically collected, studied, preserved, and exhibited the sport’s greatest treasures, including flies by countless historical and modern authorities ranging from Theodore Gordon and Mary Orvis Marbury to Lefty Kreh and Ernest Schwiebert.

The American Museum of Fly Fishing is open from 10:00 a.m.to 4:00 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday from May through October, and Tuesday through Saturday from November through June. For more information about the museum, please visit amff.org or connect on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.

Media Contact: Samantha Pitcher| 802-362-3300 ext. 205, spitcher@amff.org

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Video Hatch: “Coldwater Connection”

Video Hatch: “Coldwater Connection”

This film from the Wild Salmon Center highlights the challenges facing coastal salmon strongholds on Washington’s Olympic Peninsula and the work being done to protect these populations.


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Video Hatch: “Five Flies for April 2019”

Video Hatch: “Five Flies for April 2019”

In early spring trout start to hone in on mayflies. In this short film, Tanner Smith and Scott Dickson of Trouts Fly Fishing hit the middle Colorado River, highlighting the top five flies for April.


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